Year: 2011

In mobile photography, "Instant takes precedence over Perfect"

1:24:36 PM Ci’en Xu: Was up last night posting Berlin photos. 1:24:51 PM Ci’en Xu: Sometimes it feels like in this day and age, editing is more redundant. 1:25:03 PM Brandon Lee: How do you mean? 1:25:56 PM Ci’en Xu: I remember the days when Flickr was kinda like a big social network, and people were more obsessed about the rules of photography and how you edited them, etc. 1:26:17 PM Ci’en Xu: I guess now with mobile, instant takes precedence over “perfect”. 1:27:06 PM Brandon Lee: Yeah you’re right. 1:27:31 PM Brandon Lee: Which is why I like Mattebox… it kinda makes you feel like getting it right in-camera is important again, and maybe even enough. 1:28:02 PM Brandon Lee: When you leave everything to the phone to do automatically, there’s always the sense that you must insert yourself into the process, and that can only happen in post. 1:28:19 PM Ci’en Xu: But I still like editing, even if just to let you linger on your photos for a little while longer.  

Jon Gold on the Lumia 800 and WP7

Jon Gold bought a Lumia: Metro is undeniably gorgeous but I still can’t form an objective opinion about whether the phone as a whole is good enough to replace my iPhone. The facts say it’s good enough. My heart says no. I just can’t rationalise living outside of the Apple safety net. 80% of the population probably can, and will love a phone that smokes Android. This is how sort of how I feel every time I see Windows Phone. The smartest people I know say it's good enough, worth trying, better than Android. I'm sure they're right but it feels wrong in my gut. Is it down to being too different to what I know, and it just needs time? It's easy to point out a few of Microsoft's bold design decisions and where their intended use cases don't apply to my own needs, but in the end it's about how everything feels. But it's hard to ignore that with Nokia behind it, "Windows Phone 7.5 Mango" now has a bit of a chance, and it's …

Presenting: Object Magazine

ObjectMag.com I started a new site a few weeks back because I had a few vacation days and not much more to do than sit at home playing Batman Arkham City. The concept had been settling for awhile, without too much direct thought. Armed with the knowledge that I often take pleasure in evaluating things, and recommending said things to friends sans qualifying statements, I decided a blog about five-star, must-have products was going to have legs. It’s made with Posterous and a theme by Cory Watilo, with an Amazon affiliate store attached so I can keep as many of the featured items together in one place ready for purchase (and also because the thought of playing storekeeper sounded fun). I initially ran into some trouble with an unusual Posterous bug, but a complaint on Twitter later, and I had a direct email line to support thanks to one of their VPs, Rich Pearson. That was a great customer moment; just thought I’d mention it. So, Object is dead simple. Just three main post types.Features: …

Loving a product for all the heart’s reasons

I realized that I buy into the philosophy of a product, and the company that made it, more than any measurable aspect of the product itself. Those that reach high, have the right intentions, get a free pass now and then for falling short in some areas. I know many of you are with me on this. This is why we got excited over webOS and the Palm Pre. This is why some are falling again — unfazed by webOS’s tragic journey into obscurity — for Windows Phone 7, a well-reviewed OS that has gotten close to no traction with real consumers. It’s a form of compensation bias, driven by emotion. It’s why Instagram succeeded at launch despite low resolution 600×600 photos, why the LC-A sells and sells despite shoddy construction, why Prince and Tom Cruise’s wacky religious leanings don’t impact their bank accounts. I’m more susceptible to advertising than most. The best ones put tears in my eyes because I want to believe that companies give a damn about doing the right thing, about …

The intriguing Jawbone UP, which we can’t have in Singapore

via theverge.com Site: http://www.jawbone.com/up I’m not the first or fifth person to come to mind when a friend talks about fitness gadgetry; the only time I came close to being a buyer was with last year’s iPod nano. I used the pedometer once. Then with the 3DS and StreetPass, I tracked my walking for maybe a week before forgetting about it. The beauty of Jawbone’s UP bracelet, which I’ve been waiting for most of this year, is that you can’t really forget it. It stays wrapped around your wrist, through showers and workouts, sleep and meals, continually recording your movements and interpreting them as steps, calories, games of tennis, and fitful tosses and turns in the night. Every now and then, you plug it into your iPhone, and an app throws you beautiful infographics and logs your activity, even comparing it to friends’ if you so choose. Competition changes everything, but so does have a visual feedback loop that makes you think about your behavior, and optimizing it. And it’s just $99. I’m sure in …

View from Tokyo Sky Tree

via mdn.mainichi.jp As @tokyoreporter noted on Twitter, the view from the Tokyo Sky Tree has been unveiled, only to be blocked by mascots. It’s supposedly going to be ready by February 2012, but I’m sure a visit will be impossible until the crowds subside. Might be worth delaying my trip for.

Why Siri and Not Assistant

Tim Bajarin, via John Gruber: Yes, Siri is an important product for enhancing our user interface with the iPhone. But Siri is in its infancy. When it grows up, it will be the front end to all types of searches conducted on iPhones, iPads, Mac’s and even Apple TV. And, if I were Google or Microsoft, perhaps I too would be playing down the impact of Siri since they know full well that it is not just a threat to their product platforms, but to their core businesses of search as well. In fact, they should be quaking in their boots since Apple is taking aim at their cash cow search businesses with their technology and could very well impact their fortunes dramatically in the future. In the run up to the iPhone 4S’s unveiling, everyone believed the natural language voice recognition feature would be called Assistant. Apple Assistant. Voice Assistant. iPhone Assistant. When we learnt that they had decided to keep the Siri name, a known brand to a small set of U.S. users …